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It is difficult to test whether painkillers work for very young children and we often don't know the best dose to give. But if Professor Rebeccah Slater and her research team at Oxford are successful we may find alternative ways to measure pain in babies and may eventually be able to offer babies some better options to soothe their pain.

have a blood test: What do you think would reduce your pain?

  1. Sucrose (sugar water)
  2. Painkillers

You probably went with option 2. But in babies option 1 is often prescribed.

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