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Caroline Hartley takes part in Soapbox Science this Saturday between 2-5pm on Cornmarket Street

Soapbox Science

If you’re interested in anything from nuclear fuel to brushing your teeth, or finding out what a teabag can tell you about soil, then Oxford’s Soapbox Science is the event for you! The event takes place on Saturday 18 June between 2-5pm on Cornmarket Street in Oxford.

The Department's Caroline Hartley will be on her soapbox talking about her research on pain in babies between 4-5pm.

About Soapbox Science

Soapbox Science will be putting on a relaxed, informative and fun event which will bring cutting-edge science to Oxford town centre. The event will transform Cornmarket Street into an arena for public learning and scientific debate; hear our scientists talk about what fascinates them, and why they think they have the most fantastic job in the world!

We want to make sure that everyone has the opportunity to enjoy, learn from, question, probe, interact with and be inspired by some of our leading scientists. No middle man, no lectures, no amphitheatre – just remarkable women in science who will amaze you with their latest discoveries, and answer the science questions you have been burning to ask. 

If you’d like to see what Soapbox Science looks like in action, have a look at the Soapbox Science 2015 video

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