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Professor Irene Roberts, Professor of Paediatric Haematology at the University of Oxford Department of Paediatrics, has been appointed as Theme Lead for Non-Malignant Haematological Disorders for the National Institute of Health Research Rare Diseases Translational Research Collaboration.

This initiative, which runs from 2013 - 2017, aims to advance the understanding and management of rare diseases through integrating detailed documentation of their clinical features ('deep phenotyping') with molecular and functional studies, with the ultimate objective of improving their management.

Read more about the NIHR Rare Diseases Translational Research Collaboration here.

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