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At this year's event, Professor Rebeccah Slater introduced the audience to researching pain experienced in newborn babies, and the cutting edge methods she is using to understand it.

Pint of Science has become an important part of the Oxford Science calendar.  This year’s Festival ran from the 14- 16th of May - and all the events were fully booked!

‘Understanding Pain’ was held at the Jericho Tavern. Helen Ashdown from Primary Care Health Sciences explained how speed bumps could be used in the diagnosis of, for example, appendicitis. Meanwhile Rebecca Slater from the Paediatric Neuroimaging Research Group discussed her current work using the most up-to-date brain imaging techniques to better understand the development of pain perception in newborn babies.

Timothy Behrens (NDCN) and Chris Summerfield (Exp Psy) took part in ‘How we think and how we do at the Turl Street Kitchen. Tim explained how nature has given us a range of behavioural strategies and how these are generated within our brains. Chris addressed the weighty topic, What does it mean to "think"? A question that has eluded philosophers for thousands of years, and continues to perplex psychologists and neuroscientists.

Pint of Science is a non-profit organisation that brings some of the most brilliant scientists to a local pub to discuss their latest research and findings with you. Founded in 2012/13 it now host events on a global scale including 32 cities across the UK.  It will be back in May 2019.

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