Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Why do we celebrate the International Clinical Trials Day?

What happened 271 ago? In May 1747, at a time when scurvy was rampant among sailors, James Lind, a pioneer of naval hygiene, conducted what is now considered to be the very first clinical trial. Lind, a surgeon mate on board HMS Salisbury, recruited twelve men into a study that investigated which acidic substances could cure scurvy (spoiler alert: it was citrus fruits).

Clinical Trials DaySince then, May 20th is widely celebrated as the International Clinical Trials Day. It is an occasion to highlight the importance of clinical trials, raise awareness of participation opportunities and discuss the process of volunteering – and members of Paediatrics’ Oxford Vaccine Group have been on board with the celebrations. Alongside leaflets and stickers, Annabel Coxon and Rebecca Beckley brought in a set of Lego people, which helped to explain how herd immunity works. The Lego game has been a hit with children and adults alike!

To get involved in the clinical trials run by Paediatrics, visit our recruiting page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Similar stories

Fourth COVID-19 vaccine dose provides stronger immunity boost than third dose, shows UK study

COVID-19 vaccines given as fourth doses in the UK offer excellent boosting immunity protection, according to the latest results from a nationwide NIHR-supported study.

Oral paratyphoid vaccine to begin human trials

The University of Oxford in collaboration with the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSoM) has begun recruiting for a Phase I/II trial of a new paratyphoid vaccine in human volunteers in Oxford.

Oxford scientist named Australian of the Year in the UK

The Oxford Vaccine Group’s Lead Statistician, Professor Merryn Voysey, received the prestigious Australian of the Year in the UK award at a gala dinner recently.

Oxford to work with Brazil to establish clinical research hub

The University of Oxford and Brazilian Ministry of Health have announced a joint initiative to set up a global health and clinical research unit in Brazil led by Professor Sue Ann Clemens CBE.

Vaccine for TB receives a $1.5 million funding boost

The Oxford-run VALIDATE Network has received $1.5 million in funding for its tuberculosis vaccine work from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Oxford vaccine reaches one billion doses released

The University of Oxford’s and our partners AstraZeneca have today announced that one billion doses of the ChAdOx1 nCov-19 coronavirus vaccine have been released, to more than 170 countries, marking a key milestone as part of the University and AstraZeneca’s joint vision to make the available to the world, on a not-for-profit basis for the world during the pandemic, and in perpetuity for low- and middle-income countries.