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Why do we celebrate the International Clinical Trials Day?

What happened 271 ago? In May 1747, at a time when scurvy was rampant among sailors, James Lind, a pioneer of naval hygiene, conducted what is now considered to be the very first clinical trial. Lind, a surgeon mate on board HMS Salisbury, recruited twelve men into a study that investigated which acidic substances could cure scurvy (spoiler alert: it was citrus fruits).

Clinical Trials DaySince then, May 20th is widely celebrated as the International Clinical Trials Day. It is an occasion to highlight the importance of clinical trials, raise awareness of participation opportunities and discuss the process of volunteering – and members of Paediatrics’ Oxford Vaccine Group have been on board with the celebrations. Alongside leaflets and stickers, Annabel Coxon and Rebecca Beckley brought in a set of Lego people, which helped to explain how herd immunity works. The Lego game has been a hit with children and adults alike!

To get involved in the clinical trials run by Paediatrics, visit our recruiting page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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