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The Department of Paediatrics at the University of Oxford is delighted to announce that Anindita Roy has been named Professor of Paediatric Haematology at the University of Oxford.

Andi leads a research group based at the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine (WIMM), where the main aim is to understand the origins of childhood leukaemia, especially the treatment resistant subtypes such as infant leukaemia. She is currently a Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Career Development Fellow and an MRC Investigator.

Andi trained first as a Paediatrician (in India and then UK), before focusing her clinical and academic career in Paediatric Haematology. Her previous academic placements include LLR Clinical Training Fellowship (PhD 2007-2011, Imperial College London), NIHR Academic Clinical Lectureship in Paediatric Haematology (2011-2015, Imperial College London) and Bloodwise Clinician Scientist Fellowship (2015-2019), University of Oxford).

Andi says: “It has always been a long-term career aspiration to be an academic paediatric haematologist and I am delighted and honoured to be appointed as Professor by the Department. I am very grateful for the support of many excellent mentors, the members of my research group and funding bodies; without whose help this achievement would not have been possible. And of course, my family.”

“Being embedded within the Medical Sciences Division (MSD) at Oxford, provides me with the ideal scientific and clinical environment to perform high quality research, including the necessary infrastructure for global outreach. I am surrounded by collaborative and supportive mentors and peers, who allow me to thrive within the excellent research framework of the department. I am passionate about training the next generation of clinician scientists; and play an active role in mentoring and nurturing this group.”

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