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In HIV-1 infection, a population of latently infected cells facilitates viral persistence despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). With the aim of identifying individuals in whom ART might induce a period of viraemic control on stopping therapy, we hypothesised that quantification of the pool of latently infected cells in primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) would predict clinical progression and viral replication following ART. We measured HIV-1 DNA in a highly characterised randomised population of individuals with PHI. We explored associations between HIV-1 DNA and immunological and virological markers of clinical progression, including viral rebound in those interrupting therapy. In multivariable analyses, HIV-1 DNA was more predictive of disease progression than plasma viral load and, at treatment interruption, predicted time to plasma virus rebound. HIV-1 DNA may help identify individuals who could safely interrupt ART in future HIV-1 eradication trials.

Original publication

DOI

10.7554/eLife.03821

Type

Journal article

Journal

Elife

Publication Date

12/09/2014

Volume

3

Keywords

HIV-1, antiretroviral therapy, cure, human, human biology, infectious disease, medicine, microbiology, primary infection, reservoir, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, Biomarkers, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Demography, Disease Progression, Female, HIV Infections, HIV-1, Humans, Male, Proportional Hazards Models, RNA, Viral, Time Factors, Viral Load, Withholding Treatment