Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The emergence of untreatable strains of typhoid threatens a new global health emergency that requires urgent collective action, argue experts from Paediatrics and the Oxford Martin School in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

International neglect of typhoid outside rich countries threatens a new global health emergency © Shutterstock

Typhoid still affects at least 11 million people every year, with the real figure potentially as high as 18 million. On the eve of the rollout of a new typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV), the researchers are calling for global health institutions to dedicate new resources to tackling typhoid, which they say has become a neglected disease of poorer countries following its elimination in many high-income countries. Rising antimicrobial resistance and the ongoing outbreak of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) typhoid in Pakistan should be a wake-up call to the international community, they say.

New vaccines offer hope for typhoid control, but one intervention alone will be insufficient for eliminating the disease. Analysing the past and present of typhoid control, the researchers – including historians, immunologists and social scientists – identify a range of actions key to the strategic elimination of typhoid globally.

Read more (University of Oxford website)

Similar stories

It’s not just Covid: the triple threat that could overwhelm the NHS this winter - Andrew Pollard

A severe flu outbreak or new coronavirus variant could prove catastrophic for a health service already on its knees

Novel all-in-one vaccine developed to tackle future coronavirus threats

Up to $30 million in funding has been announced by the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) to bring a new nanoparticle vaccine offering protection against a range of coronaviruses to clinical trial.

Fourth COVID-19 vaccine dose provides stronger immunity boost than third dose, shows UK study

COVID-19 vaccines given as fourth doses in the UK offer excellent boosting immunity protection, according to the latest results from a nationwide NIHR-supported study.

Oral paratyphoid vaccine to begin human trials

The University of Oxford in collaboration with the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSoM) has begun recruiting for a Phase I/II trial of a new paratyphoid vaccine in human volunteers in Oxford.

Oxford scientist named Australian of the Year in the UK

The Oxford Vaccine Group’s Lead Statistician, Professor Merryn Voysey, received the prestigious Australian of the Year in the UK award at a gala dinner recently.

Oxford to work with Brazil to establish clinical research hub

The University of Oxford and Brazilian Ministry of Health have announced a joint initiative to set up a global health and clinical research unit in Brazil led by Professor Sue Ann Clemens CBE.